Overgrown bench on Semflex TLR

I recently acquired a beautiful early 1950s Semflex – a French TLR camera. I had wanted a Lubitel but the guy in the shop convinced me that the Semflex is much better.

I took it out for its debut on a walk around Grasmere in the Lake District. I left my wife on a small beach to do some sketching while I attempted to reach the top of Loughrigg. The Semflex is a pretty big and heavy camera and I was soon regretting the decision to take it with me, but I then came across a broken and overgrown bench, and then it seemed worth lugging the thing up the fell after all..

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I wish it was the 60s, I wish I could be happy..

My wife and I have just returned from a week in the Lake District. The last time we went I had no real interest in photography. This time I took a box with about 6 cameras in it!

While there, we visited the Abbot Hall gallery in Kendal, where they had an exhibition entitled ‘Painting Pop’, which featured the art of the early 60s. It was very interesting – I particularly enjoyed David Hockney’s ‘The Rake’s Progress’.

I had my 1959 Voightlander round my neck while we were walking round the gallery, but I put it away as I wasn’t intending to take any photographs. At this point, a lovely gallery attendant approached me, said how much she liked my camera, and said that I should go to the end of the exhibition where there was a mock up of a 1962 living room.

Needless to say, we made full use of the opportunity, and it was nice to be able to use an era-specific camera! I think my wife particularly enjoyed wearing the Jackie O sunglasses. I’m also being annoying by taking a picture of myself in every mirror I see at the moment, but seeing a drinks cabinet filled with Babycham glasses with a mirror at the back seemed too good an opportunity to miss…

 

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Fun with the Minolta X700

One of the reasons I got into film photography is because I like the unexpected. I like not knowing how the pictures will come out until weeks later. I like having total control over every aspect of the camera without having any autofocus or anything like that.

When I went to Budapest a few months ago I had every intention of buying a Soviet relic such as a FED or Zorki (I still want one!). Instead, I came out with an eighties Minolta X700 SLR, which isn’t what I thought I would want. Indeed, for a while I felt like I had betrayed myself by buying a camera that has a lightmeter and features such as aperture priority mode.
I realise that this is ridiculous seeing as the camera itself probably now qualifies as an antique rather than a hi-tech piece of kit!

Anyway, I feel like I’ve made my peace with the Minolta now. It’s a nice compromise between having a fully manual camera (and you can ignore or turn off all of the help), and something that goes some way to helping you a little.

I haven’t had a chance to take many pictures recently as I’ve been writing a book and doing lots of GCSE exam marking, so I’ve strung this roll of film out for a long time. Sometimes you can get some nice surprises back when this happens.

Here’s some pictures I took in the depths of the Tate Modern a few months back. The room was very dark so it was nice to have the help of the light meter, which advised the slowest shutter speed possible. I’m pretty pleased with the results. It’s probably a cool picture more due to it being a cool artwork than because anything I’ve done, but still, I like them.

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH

 

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As we walked away from the Tate Modern, we stopped at the normal tourist trap on the South Bank where the youngsters gather to show off their skateboard and BMX skills. I wanted to try and capture a sense of motion with a slow shutter speed. I’m pleased with the first one of the person on the BMX – I thought the background might come out blurred given the slow shutter speed and my shaky hands but that hasn’t happened..

 

Autosave-File vom d-lab2/3 der AgfaPhoto GmbH